Accepted

Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) Claudia Rivas provides an expert psychological assessment that helps clients follow their dreams and stay with their families.

In search of greener pastures, many people opt to migrate to foreign lands with better opportunities. They deem that all the challenges and stress that they will face in the immigration process and actual adaptation of another culture would be worth it in the end. However, the transition can be further complicated should they pursue legal status in the United States.

Aside from providing psychotherapy, Claudia Rivas, LCSW also supports families and individuals by conducting their immigration psychological assessment. She has been in this field for the past 17 years and has been working with many different lawyers in the U.S. She also graduated with a Master of Arts Degree in Clinical Social Work from New York University (NYU), a master’s in applied psychology from Fairfield University (CT) and she received an Honorary Ph.D. in Psychoanalysis from Southern California University from Professional Studies.

Understanding that varying experiences of immigration, exile, and displacement can be overwhelming, she makes sure to help ease the emotional and social challenges of her clients through her expertise. “My professional and personal knowledge of multinational identity makes me especially sensitive to issues of cultural selfhood and adjustment,” she said.

An immigration psychological evaluation helps immigration courts determine whether an individual will be able to lawfully stay in the country. Therefore, the comprehensive evaluation must be conducted by an expert who understands the complex factors involved in immigration cases. This can tremendously help the lawyer support the case with the exhaustive value it should provide.

As someone who experienced immigration firsthand, Claudia can relate to the situation of her clients. She is therefore capable of bringing a friendly and comforting presence to all her work as a skilled psychotherapist in private practice. “Much of my career is about reaching people in their struggles with these issues, resonating with their frustration, pain, and ambivalence,” she added. In high consideration of their well-being, she carefully goes through the process of the psychological evaluation to make sure that her clients get to see the full picture and manage their expectations.

The evaluation includes in-depth interviews. Potential clients can be assured that their assessment will include all relevant medical, social, and psychological history required by the authorities. The importance of having the psychological assessment be prepared by an experienced practitioner who must be familiar with the unique requirements of the Extreme Difficulty Standard used in the I-601 and I-601a exemption applications cannot be overstated. To know more about Claudia’s services, visit her website at https://claudiaribaslcsw.com now.

About Claudia Ribas, LCSW

Claudia Ribas specializes in Psychological Reports for Immigrants. She works with immigrants and their families from any country. Her assessment interviews are done by a questionnaire, which is sent via email, and an interview through video telehealth. 

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Immigration project approved by the Chamber

Imigrants Photo

The House passed two immigration bills that set a path to citizenship for millions of people. This project aims to restore humanity and American values ​​to the immigration system. The first bill would impact children illegally brought into the country. About 2.5 million people who arrived in the US as children would become eligible for citizenship. This bill would eventually allow most undocumented immigrants to become citizens. Currently, around 4,500 children are in the custody of Customs and Border Protection. In the first week of Joe Biden’s presidency, his efforts to reverse former President Donald Trump’s tight US immigration policies were successful. The new executive policies change Trump’s zero-tolerance policy, which has resulted in the separation of many families. Immigrant rights activists have insisted that the Biden administration allow affected families to be reunited. He had promised to stop most deportations for 100 days. About Biden, more unaccompanied children are being allowed to stay in the US. 2. The second bill is the Agricultural Labor Force Modernization Law. The new law would provide a way for agricultural workers to attain legal status. It is estimated that at least half of the 2.4 million rural workers are illegally in the US. Through this bill, the US will provide farmworkers with important labor protections and legal rights that they never had before and that they desperately need today. Democrats supported the bill, and most Republicans opposed it. Votes from at least 10 Senate Republicans are required to pass the legislation. The bipartisan immigration deal is seen as one of the top priorities of the Biden administration. Democratic-led states and immigration groups fought in court in cases related to US immigration policies.

biden-admin-announcement

The Biden Administration took office on January 20, 2021. Many executive orders have been executed since that date, some of which directly change the manner of handling immigration matters.  However, the U.S. and the world are still dealing with the global pandemic, and this directly affects submissions, filings, and consular appointments.  This update provides a list of the latest updates to U.S. visas and immigration matters, as well as what we forecast for the months to come.

  • Immigrant Visa Ban:  The Immigrant Visa Ban that was imposed last year was revoked on February 24, 2021.  Now employment and family-based immigrant visas can again be issued by the U.S. Consulates.  See: A Proclamation on Revoking Proclamation 10014 | The White House
  • Entry to the U.S. via a Land Port of Entry from Mexico and Canada:  The entry via land ports remains restricted to essential travel, those on work visas, U.S. citizens, U.S. permanent residents, and a few other limited exceptions.  The entry restrictions are temporary in nature and as of now are expected to remain in effect through March 21, 2021.  The date has been postponed several times and it is unknown if it will again be postponed.  See:  https://help.cbp.gov/s/article/Article-1694?language=en_US
  • Air Travel from Mexico and Canada into the U.S.: Currently there are no limits to air travel from Mexico and Canada.
  • Covid Travel Ban Restrictions: Any travel from Brazil, China, U.K., Ireland, Schengen Countries, and Iran is subject to a National Interest Exception (NIE) waiver from the U.S. Consulate prior to traveling to the U.S.
  • Negative Covid Test:  All inbound passengers are required to obtain a negative Covid test within 72 hours prior to boarding the flight.  This includes air travel from Mexico and Canada.
  • Local Quarantine Rules in the U.S.:  All travelers must also research local travel rules upon arrival in the U.S.  For example, New York City and San Francisco have additional quarantine rules upon arrival.
  • Visa Stamping Ban:  The Visa Stamping Ban that was imposed through an executive order from the prior administration for H-1B, L-1, J-1, and H-2B remains in effect. This ban expires on March 31, 2021.  The Biden administration is not expected to extend this ban.  This ban prevents the U.S. Consulates from issuing new visas in this category.  This ban has prevented many executives and highly skilled workers from being able to enter the U.S.
  • Travel from the Middle East:  The U.S. has canceled the blanket travel ban from select countries in the Middle East.
  • H-1B Lottery:  The selection criteria will be the same as last year.   The lottery starts on March 9, 2021 and goes to March 31, 2021.  Winners will be announced on March 31 and then the employer has until June 30, 2021 to file the H-1B petition.
  • H-1B Adjudications at USCIS:  The H-1B Adjudications at the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) are expected to return to 2016 standards,  with deference given to prior adjudications, acceptance of multiple educational pathways to an H-1B occupation, etc.
  • USCIS Operational Efficiency: Expected to be a priority going forward.  The Administration is expected to ensure that USCIS operates at an efficient pace so that the backlogs of prior years are not repeated.
  • DACA: The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (“DACA”) has been reaffirmed for both existing DACA recipients and new applicants.
  • Asylum:  The U.S. will again provide opportunities for applicants to apply and have a credible fear interview at the border. If they pass the credible fear interview, they will be allowed into the U.S. to wait for their full asylum merits hearing before an Immigration Judge.
  • Comprehensive Immigration Reform: Under the new Administrations some sort of immigration legislation is expected.  Such new provisions are expected to address both labor market and humanitarian needs.  The Administration announced a draft plan on  February 18, 2021.

E-2 Investor Visas:  In recent months Mexican investors have shown an increased interest in the E-2 non-immigrant visa.  As the pandemic slowly subsides, it is hoped that the U.S. Consulate in Ciudad Juarez will be able to increase their volume of E-2 reviews.  The firm has a robust E-2 visa practice.

NAFTA TN Visas:  The United States– Canada- Mexico Agreement (USCMA) replaced the NAFTA Agreement.  The new USMCA went into effect on July 1, 2020.   However, the TN occupational list and regulations remained the same. Therefore, for select occupations, the TN visa continues to be a quick and efficient way for an U.S. employer to get a Mexican or Canadian citizen on the U.S. payroll.    See:  https://www.nafsa.org/regulatory-information/usmca-chapter-16-appendix-2-professionals

For U.S. companies looking to hire foreign employees or international businesses looking to invest in the U.S., navigating the ever-changing U.S. immigration landscape can be tricky. This is especially the case following the change in presidential administrations and the reshaping of immigration policies the Biden administration is pursuing. How might U.S. immigration policies change under the new Biden administration given the various anti-immigration Covid-measures that were instituted in 2020.  To hear more about the key immigration challenges facing international companies looking to do business in the U.S.  tune into our French Desk podcast and listen to Sheppard Mullin’s Sarah Aberg and CEO of Guidepost Solutions, Julie Myers Wood discuss this topic in detail on episode two of the French Insider.

United States Visa Approved

Psychological Evaluations for Immigration

A comprehensive, expert evaluation conducted by a psychologist can help keep you from being deported.

Have you lost an I-601 hardship waiver case, asylum case, criminal deportation case, or a VAWA Abused Spouse case? Do you lack documentation to prove hardship, abuse, or mental health issues? If you’re struggling with the immigration process, you’re not alone. There are tools, tips, and resources to help you stay safely in the US.

How Can Valid Hardship Cases Get denied?

The most common reason legitimate hardship cases are dismissed is due to lack of adequate documentation. Immigration lawyers often require more substantial evidence to win a hardship case. A psychological report done by a professional can help show a judge or USCIS officer why your case should be approved.

Learn everything you need to know about the impact of a psychological report for immigration, what type of immigration cases they’re best for, and how to arrange an evaluation for yourself.

Who Are Psychological Evaluations For?

Psychological reports add tremendous value to the immigration case. Even if your application has been denied, you may be able to re-submit your claim with stronger documentation to sway even the most difficult immigration officials. If you’re just starting the immigration process, move forward with your immigration proceedings with proper documentation to help your case.

Will a Psychological Evaluation Help my Case?

A psychological report done by a professional can help keep you in the US. Reports are often an asset in major immigration proceedings, including:

  • Extreme Hardship Cases
  • Victims of Domestic Violence (VAWA)
  • Political Asylum Cases
  • Victims of Criminal Activity (U Visa)
  • I-751 Good Faith Waivers
  • Humanitarian Visa
  • T-Visa

Proving you have a legitimate reason to be in the US can drastically reduce the possibility of being deported. Here’s how to do it.

How Can I Arrange a Psychological Report?

Has your attorney recommended that you get a report from an immigration evaluation therapist?

Claudia Ribas is a licensed psychotherapist specializing in helping immigrants stay lawfully in the US. Don’t worry. The process is simple, easy, and quick!

What Happens During a Psychological Evaluation?

Evaluations include questionaries send via email and 1/2 zoom interview. In the questionaries you’ll be asked questions about your immigration issues, family history, relationships, work history, medical and mental health history. These questions are essential to understand your case and why you deserve to stay in the United States as a lawful citizen.

Always keep in mind every immigration case is unique. Your psychotherapist might use various methods, instruments, measures, and techniques, including surveys, health inventories, self-reports, and cognitive tests during your assessment. Again, this is nothing to be worried, scared, or embarrassed about. This is your truth. The right hands must see it.

Book Today

You have a legitimate reason to be here. Navigating the system can be overwhelming, stressful, and confusing. You don’t have to do it alone.

Click here to get started. Leave Claudia a message so you can start getting the proof you need to stay in the United States today.

ClaudiaRibaslcsw@gmail.com

(914) 261-0596

www.claudiaribaspsychologicalreports.com

www.claudiaribaslcsw.com

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWSYiy1sBbmcepBZSfaaoDw

https://www.linkedin.com/in/claudia-ribas-lcsw-0a3182133/

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Brazilian immigrants to the US

Brazilian

Changes in U.S. immigration law made it more difficult for Brazilians to obtain tourist visas, a standard mode of entry that often resulted in overstaying to work illegally in the U.S. The Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 also made it more difficult for people who had previously entered the country illegally to enter legally. As a result of these policy reforms, the number of Brazilians illegally entering the United States via the US-Mexico border has increased. Many who return to Brazil cite finances and curiosity as reasons for their migration. Many that stay in the United States are assisted by a system of transnational religious and social networks. The reasons for migration are not solely economic; they are influenced by several interconnected and nuanced factors, including adventure, interest, the cultural impact of the United States, family members, education, and escape.

One of the problems that the state's rising Brazilian population of legal and illegal immigrants’ faces is stolen labor. Many Brazilians are caught in a legal bind due to a lack of documentation. Others with qualifications, such as medical care, must take more menial jobs due to the high cost and complicated certification process. One of the Brazilians entered the Brazilian Immigration Center in Boston wearing work clothes and a white-painted mask. He, like so many others, was seeking assistance in receiving his salary. His new employer hadn't paid him in 40 days, which wasn't the first time he'd gone without pay. Like most other immigrant communities, Brazilians arrive in the country with a renewed desire to succeed. Fresh new ideas can be generated as a result, which can help to fuel an entrepreneurial push. Many young Brazilians move to the United States. The explicit goal of working, often with a high degree of expertise already education, is essential. The migrant may already be fluent in English. Furthermore, Brazilians currently feel relatively at ease in the city, finding that Anglo Americans often see them better than other immigrant groups. This all makes it easier for Brazil's integration into Greater Boston's and the United States' consumer economies States are divided into two categories.

Brazilian immigrants at US-Mexico border:

The Brazilian immigrant community may be underestimating the challenges they will face in the coming years. The issue of immigration status, which is widely assumed to be the most significant obstacle for Brazilian immigrants, is just one of many challenges that Brazilians will face. The unidentified, unaccounted for, mostly come from lower socioeconomic backgrounds and face even more significant obstacles to inclusion in Brazil and the United States, where legal barriers exist. (Lazar-Neto et al., 2017). Additional racial and socioeconomic barriers may emerge. Light-skinned Brazilians, for example, have almost universally found that they stand out aesthetically as non-white and alien to white North Americans. This does not, however, imply that the Brazilian is doomed to poverty. Indeed, if Brazilians organize themselves around issues relevant to a just society and a more inclusive world, as they are already doing around immigration-related issues, they will achieve their goals. The future seems to be much more promising. The Brazilian government's biggest problem is, without a doubt, the immigrant culture revolves around the relationships that they must establish with their neighbors. (Lazar-Neto et al., 2017).

Lazar-Neto, F., Louzada, A. C. S., de Moura, R. F., Calixto, F. M., & Castro, M. C. (2017). Depression and Its Correlates Among Brazilian Immigrants in Massachusetts, USA. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 20(4), 832–840.

Law for immigrant and Brazilian in the United States

 

The rules established by the United States federal government for determining who can enter the country and for how long they can be known as immigration laws. According to the United States Constitution, Congress has the exclusive authority to legislate in the field of immigration. The immigration laws of the United States are focused on the following principles: family reunification, encouraging immigrants with valuable skills to contribute to the economy of the United States, protecting refugees, and promoting diversity. (Hamann, 2017).

 

Immigration regulations are administered and enforced by three federal agencies. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) investigates and prosecutes those who violate the law. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) oversees legal immigration applications. Border security is the responsibility of Customs and Border Protection (CBP). A person who wishes to immigrate to the United States must complete a set of detailed applications with the federal government. However, immigration law is constantly changing, making it difficult, if not impossible, for anyone to stay up to date.(Lazar-Neto et al., 2017).

 

The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) is the primary source of naturalization and citizenship legislation in the United States. Immigrants may become citizens of the United States in a variety of ways.

  • An immigrant who was born in the United States of America or one of its domains.
  • An immigrant with American parents who were born in the United States.
  • By becoming a naturalized citizen which usually entails a residency period and the passing of a citizenship test.
  • An immigrant who Being a minor with one or more naturalized citizens with one or both parents.

Immigration is considered as a particular practice field that is not suitable for general practitioners among attorneys. It is not advisable to reflect oneself. Most people who apply for U.S. immigration agencies will obtain a green with the help of an experienced attorney and ultimately become citizens of the United States. In the United States, family-based immigration is the only secure way to obtain citizenship, but the legislation also allows employees and investors to obtain citizenship. Another way to obtain citizenship is for one of the family members to file a petition and initiate the process. (Lazar-Neto et al., 2017).

One way is to seek asylum at official border crossings, also known as ports of entry. That begins a lengthy legal process in which they must demonstrate a well-founded fear of persecution in their home country. However, several people become irritated by the long lines and decide not to queue at all. So, they take a different approach: they cross the border outside of the official crossings — either secretly or freely — and surrender to Border Patrol officers, who then detain them on the American side. When migrants who walk or sneak across the border are arrested, Border Patrol agents transport them to detention centers where they are subjected to a medical examination and a criminal background check.(Hamann, 2017).

Sources:

Hamann, E. (2017). Trump, Immigration, and Children. Anthropology News, 58(3), e345–e349.

Heyman, J. M. (2008). Tough Questions in the US Immigration Debate: Finding a Moral Heart for US Immigration Policy Revisited. Anthropology News, 49(5), 10–11.

ImigrationLaw

 

The rules established by the United States federal government for determining who can enter the country and for how long they can remain are known as immigration law. Congress has the exclusive authority to legislate in the field of immigration, according to the United States Constitution. The immigration laws of the United States are focused on the following principles: family reunification, encouraging immigrants with valuable skills to contribute to the economy of the United States, protecting refugees, and promoting diversity.

Immigration regulations are administered and enforced by three federal agencies. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) investigates and prosecutes those who violate the law. US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) oversees legal immigration applications. Border security is the responsibility of Customs and Border Protection (CBP). A person who wishes to immigrate to the United States must complete a set of detailed applications with the federal government. However, immigration law is constantly changing, making it difficult, if not impossible, for anyone to stay up to date.

The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) is the main source of naturalization and citizenship legislation in the United States. Immigrants may become citizens of the United States in a variety of ways.

  • An immigrant who was born in the United States of America or one of its domains.
  • An immigrant with American parents who was born in the United States.
  • By becoming a naturalized citizen which usually entails a period of residency and the passing of a citizenship test.
  • an immigrant who Being a minor with one or more naturalized citizens with one or both parents.

The immigration is considered as a special practice field that is not suitable for general practitioners among attorneys. It is not advisable to reflect oneself. Most people who apply for US immigration agencies will be able to obtain a green  with the help of an experienced attorney and ultimately become citizens of the United States. In the United States, family-based immigration is the only secure way to obtain citizenship, but legislation also allows employees and investors to obtain citizenship. Another way to obtain citizenship is for one of the family members to file a petition and initiate the process.

Most immigrants are trying to get away from precarious conditions. According to a study by the Congressional Research Service, most unaccompanied minors have been victims of gang abuse and torture. However, immigration judges recently established a rule stating that people fleeing attacks based on their gender or sexual orientation should be eligible for asylum. Inadequate infrastructure is to blame for the current border backlog. For most of them, seeking asylum is the only legal way into the United States under existing immigration law, which dates to 1954 and was last revised in 1996. Perhaps more than before, the United States became recognized as a place where people could find both freedom from oppression and material prosperity.

CONFERENCE

 

House-passed immigration bill

The House passed two immigration bills that would establish a path to citizenship for millions of people. This bill aims to restore humanity and American values to the immigration system.

The American Dreams and Promises Act applies widely to immigrants known as dreamers.

  1. The first bill would impact those unlawfully brought to the country as children. About 2.5 million people who arrived in the U.S. as children would become eligible for a path to citizenship. This bill would eventually allow most undocumented immigrants to become citizens. Currently, about 4,500 children are in Customs & Border Protection custody.

In the first week of Joe Biden’s presidency, his efforts to reverse former President Donald Trump’s strict United States immigration policies have been hit and miss. On the other hand, his executive policies change Trump’s zero-tolerance policy that resulted in the separation of many families. Immigrant rights campaigners have insisted Biden’s administration let the affected families reunite. He had promised to stop most deportations for 100 days.

Under Biden, more unaccompanied children are being allowed to remain in the U.S.

2. The second bill is the Farm Workforce Modernization Act. It would provide a path to legal status for farmworkers.It is estimated at least half of 2.4 million farmworkers are staying illegally in the U.S. Through this bill U.S. will provide farmworkers with important work protections and legal rights that they never had before and they desperately need today.

Democrats favored the bill, and most Republicans opposed it. Votes from at least 10 Senate Republicans are needed to pass the legislation.

The bipartisan immigration deal is seen as a key priority for the Biden administration. Immigration groups and Democratic-led states fought cases regarding United States immigration policies, in court.

 

You seem to be feeling very stuck. You are describing feelings that might be sadness and frustration. And there are very real reasons to feel those things these days!! You might be starting to feel more of a deep sadness or depression – that can make us feel the sort of stuck you are describing too. Your symptoms and feelings could be related to so many things — a physical struggle, an emotional one or maybe a combination. Don’t worry – whatever it is, there are ways to ease your pain and address the issue. It could be that fear has taken over – the pandemic is making everyone a bit nervous; Fear can really make us paralyzed and sometimes feels just like sadness! Also, you just graduated and might be missing the structure that you had become accustomed to. It might help to develop goals … little goals at the beginning. Each time you hit a goal you may get that burst of good feelings that help propel us to the next goal. Sometimes the stuck sadness you are describing comes from things we can change on our own and sometimes we need help. If goal setting seems too hard, too scary, or just a bad idea, don’t be afraid to reach out, like you’ve done here, for help!! Friends, a trusted counselor, a relative — these are all people who might be able to help you as you work this through. You have already done something to “unstick” yourself just be reaching out today!! That in and of itself is something to be proud of and may be the very first step in beginning to feel better. Remember, if you feel in any way too sad to manage, get help right away. You can call any professional or even 911 in an emergency. But again, you’ve already started the healing – you have reached out and begun. I’d be happy to chat with you about some other ways can understand what is going on and some other ways to get you through it. And bear in mind, many, many people are struggling right now – this has been a maddening, frustrating and scary year. Be kind to yourself.

By Claudia Ribas LCSW